Mens Skin Care Male Plastic Surgery

According to the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery, 83 percent of men believe that “appearance plays a role in their professional success and advancement.” For some men, plastic surgery procedures can play an important role in keeping the skin youthful and refreshed.

However, plastic surgery isn’t for everyone, and you should consider the pros and cons carefully before you opt for male plastic surgery as a way to keep up your skin’s appearance.

Cosmetic surgeons are medical doctors who have received specialized training in performing cosmetic procedures. By definition, cosmetic or plastic surgery procedures are surgical procedures that improve or restore the body’s appearance, but aren’t medically necessary.

Cosmetic and Plastic Surgery Procedures

Opting for cosmetic surgery is a decision that shouldn’t be made lightly. It’s important to understand the details and risks of the men’s plastic surgery option you’re considering. The terms people use for different surgeries can be confusing. Here are some examples of medical procedures, including male plastic surgery options, and their common names:

  • Abdominoplasty: A tummy tuck, which tightens sagging skin on the stomach.
  • Blepharoplasty: An eye lift, which tightens drooping or wrinkled skin around the eyes.
  • Botox®: Injection of botulinium toxin that temporarily reduces the appearance of wrinkles and makes skin appear tighter.
  • Calf lift: Calf implants, which make legs appear to have more muscle tone.
  • Genioplasty: A chin augmentation, which can make the face look stronger and more balanced.
  • Hair transplantation: Permanent redistribution of hair follicles into areas with hair loss. (This procedure isn’t just for a bald spot on your head; men can also have chest hair transplantations.)
  • Liposculpture: Liposuction, which removes unwanted fat from different areas of the body.
  • Male breast reduction: Reduction of the size of the breasts (Some men suffer from excessive breast development, or “gynecomastia.”)
  • Otoplasty: Reshaping of the ears, making them closer to the head if they protrude (“ear pinning”) or making them smaller.
  • Rhinoplasty: A nose job, which changes the shape or size of the nose. (This procedure may also fix a deviated septum, which can make breathing difficult.)

 Upper and Lower Eye Lift Procedures - Male Plastic Surgery

Cosmetic and Plastic Surgery Statistics

Whichever male plastic surgery procedure you choose to have done, know that you are not alone. In 2007, the American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery (AACS) doctors performed plastic surgery procedures on almost 1 million patients.

Guys in particular may feel self-conscious about getting plastic surgery, since traditionally, more females opt for cosmetic procedures. However, male plastic surgery procedures are on the rise. According to plastic surgery statistics released by the AACS, the total number of men’s plastic surgery patients increased by 13.7 percent between 2002 and 2007.

If you’re ready to have plastic surgery, choose a doctor who specializes in the treatment you want to have done, and examine your options. There’s nothing wrong with consulting with more than one surgeon, as male plastic surgery is a serious and expensive choice to make.

Resources

American Academy of Dermatology Staff. (2009). Fact sheet. Retrieved January 11, 2010, from the AAD Web site: http://www.aad.org/media/background/factsheets/index.html.

American Academy of Dermatology Staff. (2009). Your dermatologist. Retrieved January 11, 2010, from the AAD Web site: http://www.aad.org/public/publications/pamphlets/general_your.html.

American Academy of Dermatology Staff. (2009). What is a dermatologist? Retrieved January 11, 2010, from the AAD Web site: http://www.aad.org/public/specialty/what.html.

American Society of Plastic Surgery Staff. (2009). For patients: Cosmetic procedures. Retrieved January 11, 2009, from the Cosmetic Surgery Web site: http://www.cosmeticsurgery.org/patients/procedures.cfm.

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2009). Cosmetic surgery. Retrieved January 11, 2009, from the Mayo Clinic Web site: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cosmetic-surgery/SN00006.