Flu Cdc Vaccines

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is a federally funded organization that serves to inform people of important health issues. Using modern communications technology, data is recorded from all over the world. Comprehensive reports are compiled so that clinicians can use them to help educate and treat their patients. Below are some key CDC recommendations for the swine flu.

CDC Clarification on Swine Flu: Is “Swine Flu” same as “H1N1”?

The US Department of Agriculture has persistently asked the news media to refer to the novel influenza A virus by its real name, “H1N1,” and not “swine flu.”

In fact, worldwide, pork farmers have been financially affected by the implied origin of the potentially lethal virus. Contrary to its name, swine flu is not transmitted via eating pork products.

Furthermore, the CDC has determined that the H1N1 virus is different from what normally circulates in pigs, and is a true human virus. However, the name “swine flu” is still widely used. However, for all intents and purposes, the “swine flu” is the same as “H1N1 flu.”

CDC General Recommendations

The swine flu is usually spread from one person to another by respiratory droplets. Viral particles found in the forceful sneeze or cough from an infected person can be transmitted to the respiratory system of another person.

For this reason, the CDC strongly recommends that proper hygiene always be observed—particularly when in contact with others. This includes washing your hands with soap and water often and avoiding contact with sick people.

If you become ill with the flu, stay home from work. Plenty of rest, along with increased fluid intake, is the best way for your body to recover. Flu symptoms may be relieved with prescription or over-the-counter medications.

Because the swine flu is a new disease entity that may have serious complications, seek emergency help if you experience uncommon or prolonged flu symptoms. These warning signs include:

  • Confusion
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Dizziness
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Severe or persistent vomiting.

CDC Swine Flu Vaccination Recommendations

Vaccinations remain an integral part of infection control. The CDC recommends both the regular seasonal flu shot and the swine flu shot for those at high risk for contracting the flu virus. Currently, the swine flu shot is in short supply. Thus, the CDC has a priority list for those who should be first in line for the swine flu shot:

  • Children from six months to five years old
  • Health care workers
  • People 50 years of age and older
  • People with certain chronic health conditions (such as asthma)
  • People who live in nursing homes
  • People who live with or provide care for infants younger than six months
  • Pregnant women.

Check the CDC Web site (cdc.gov) for the latest in swine flu news and guidelines.

Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff. (2009). About CDC. Retrieved December 5, 2009, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/about/.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff. (2009). H1N1 flu and you. Retrieved December 9, 2009, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/qa.htm.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff. (2009). People at high risk of developing flu-related complications. Retrieved December 9, 2009, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/highrisk.htm.

Fiore, A. et al. (2009). Prevention and control of seasonal influenza with vaccines. Retrieved December 9, 2009, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Web site: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr58e0724a1.htm.

WCTV Staff. (2009). Stop calling it swine flu! From the WCTV Web site: http://www.wctv.tv/wswghealth/headlines/59143722.html.